Patience (Confessions of a Non-Gamer)

So the semester is finally over! And so is our class. Sadly, I think, so are my video game-playing days. Something that I’ve realized is crucial when playing video games, something that I think I lack, is patience. I’m thinking about playing Assassin’s Creed: Liberation and how long it took me to complete the tasks I…

Indigenous Women’s Digital Media and Representing Violence

A couple of weeks ago, I attended Coming To You From the Indigenous Future: A Showcase of Indigenous Women’s Digital media. My experiences at there really meshed with a lot of class discussions, particularly the one we had about the representation of slavery in Assassin’s Creed: Freedom Cry. The showcase presented a wide array of…

Project Exposition Day

Getting to play every group’s game and hearing them talk about their project was a really fun way to end the course. It was interesting to see how many different directions we all went in–for everything from interface to storyline to art design. One of the most memorable parts of class to me was when…

Is Reddit a game?

This question was raised in class, and immediately followed by a discussion about the terms of interactivity for a game. They were defined as Making narrative choices (changes game) Engaging gameplay challenges (changes you) Experiencing world (movement through game) If we apply those standards for interaction to Reddit, it should pass–users contribute content that changes…

Playerbases: The Lifeblood of Online Gaming

Whenever a game is shared between two or more people over the internet, it is usually hosted on a server. The server will collect information from all parties, send information back, and generally allow you all to play together with minimal delay. Usually, when a game is released with online play, the developers will dedicate…

“That’s okay,” yes, but…

Reading “Future Historians Probably Won’t Understand Our Internet” put me through a whirlwind of emotions, which changed (almost) as quickly as the temperature on a spring day in Amherst. At first, I was sad and disappointed– we won’t be able to preserve our experiences for future generations? People who live a thousand years from now…